Amy Leonard - English

ELIT/WMST 21: Women's Literature: Analyzing the Heroines and Villains in Women's Literature

ELIT_21_image

Quarter: Spring 2012

Units: 4

Section 1

Office Hour: MW 9:30-10:20

                    TTH 12:30-1:20

Location: L-75
Time: 11:30-12:20pm M-TH

Required Texts:

 Class Syllabus: ELIT 21 Syllabus

Class Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/ELIT-21/324794977569693

Course Description:  

ELIT/WMST 21 is a 4unit literature course focused on the study of literary works by and about women. We'll interpret readings from various genres and styles, including multiple perspectives and experiences of culture, history, race, class, and sexuality. And we'll acknowledge and account for alternate interpretations, noting how the distinctive qualities of each text—plot, character, theme, style, point of view, and related narrative concerns—contribute to our interpretations. Through reading, writing, and talking about how women's lives are represented in these texts, we'll also explore the socio-cultural historical conditions shaping these depictions and consider what this might tell us about our own lives, times, and attitudes.

 

Course Objectives:

  1. Interpret a variety of literary texts (novels, short stories, spoken word, plays, poetry, critical essays) and about women from different historical periods and cultures.
  2. Understand and appreciate the distinctive qualities of plot development, character development, theme, structure, setting, allegory, symbolism, tone, point of view, irony, and related narrative concerns in response to the role of women.
  3. Acknowledge and account for alternate textual interpretations.
  4. Distinguish the influences of class, culture, and sexuality on women as writers, characters, subjects, and readers of literary texts.
  5. Analyze, evaluate, and employ current approaches in literary criticism as they relate to women.
  6. Examine the changing perspectives of women writers and the current discussions and debates over the social construction of literary values.

 

Recommendation:

You will get the most out of this class if you have already successfully completed EWRT 1A. 

 

GRADING POLICY

Each of your assignments will receive points. Here is a list of the assignments you will do and the total points possible for each assignment:

Assignment

Points

Percent of Grade

Literary Debates

150

15%

Literature Analysis paper

100

10%

Weekly Responses

100

10%

Term Paper

200

20%

Final Presentation

200

20%

Participation

150

15%

Quizzes

100

10%

Total

1000

   100%

 

Attendance:

All class time counts and attendance every day is required. After four absences, you will be in danger of being withdrawn from the course. Two tardies are equivalent to an absence. Students who are absent are responsible for all announcements made, assignments given, and material covered. Students are also responsible for turning in all assignments on time. Assignments turned in late will lose 1 full letter grade for each class day missed. Group work, quizzes, and tests missed due to unexcused absences or tardies may not be made up. Note: If you are absent any day the first week, I will drop you to give your spot to a wait-listed student.

 

Assignments:

 

Literary Debates (75 Points x 2 =150 pts)

For this assignment, you will battle your fellow scholars in a literary debate about the texts we have read. Your goal will be to convince the audience to agree with your interpretation of the text. There will be two formal debates throughout the quarter.

 

Literature Analysis Paper: (100 pts total) In order to develop and appreciate the keen awareness of narrative/poetic forms, themes, images, literary styles/movements, and historical contexts, you will be asked to a detailed 2-3 pg analyses of a character in one of the texts we have read.

 

Quizzes: (10 pts each, 100 pts total)

Because this class has a lot of reading, I want to make sure that you are keeping up with the reading and understanding it. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer, analysis of a passage, and passage identification. The questions on the quiz will be taken from texts that we discuss in class and texts we do not discuss in class, so make sure you read everything.

 

Term Paper (200 pts)

This paper will be 5-8 pages and can focus on one text or one theme in several texts. It can also be developed from one of the student’s response papers.

 

Final: (150 pts)

Because this class covers an enormous amount of women’s literature, we cannot read everything. Your job for the final will be to work in a team and prepare a short presentation on an author that we did not get a chance to read or that you think should be included in the next ELIT 21.

 

Participation: (150 pts)

ELIT 21 is a discussion-based course. Your class “presence” will be public and you will be asked to express your ideas about the texts regularly. Students are expected to do the assigned readings before each session and to come prepared to discuss the readings in both small groups and class discussions. If you remain passive, you will do poorly. If you attend every class but participate minimally, the highest grade you will receive for participation will be a C. You must be prepared, engaged, and involved in the classroom community in order to succeed.

 

Weekly Responses: You will pick one question from the discussion/study questions and write a 1/2-page response answer. These responses will be due weekly on Thursdays and should be treated as informal writing. The purpose of this assignment is to get you thinking about the texts, reacting to them, and brewing ideas for the formal papers.


Extra Credit Opportunity:

Review of a Film/Play Version of One of Our Texts: (50 points): Women in Literature have frequently been transferred to the silver screen, so this assignment will allow you to truly analyze how this changes our heroines!

 

GRADE SCALE:

97-100%=A+ 

87-89%=B+ 

77-79%=C+ 

67-69%=D+ 

59% and below=F 

93-96%=A 

83-86%=B 

73-76%=C 

63-66%=D 

  

90-92%=A- 

80-82%=B- 

70 – 72 = C-

60-62%=D- 

  

GRADING POLICY

Each of your assignments will receive points. Here is a list of the assignments you will do and the total points possible for each assignment:

Attendance:

All class time counts and attendance every day is required. After four absences, you will be in danger of being Withdrawn from the course. Two tardies are equivalent to an absence. Students who are absent are responsible for all announcements made, assignments given, and material covered. Students are also responsible for turning in all assignments on time. Assignments turned in late will lose 1 full letter grade for each class day missed. Group work, quizzes, and tests missed due to unexcused absences or tardies may not be made up. Note: If you are absent any day the first week, I will drop you to give your spot to a wait-listed student. 

 Class Policies:

 Honesty:

I am interested in your ideas as well as how clearly you can discuss the ideas of others. If you use the ideas of anyone else (printed, friends, on-line), acknowledge your source immediately in parentheses. If you use the words of a source, use quotation marks and acknowledge the source. In general, plagiarism automatically results in an F for the entire course. If you are uncertain about the rules for using a source, come see me before you turn in the assignment.

Politeness:

Please, come to class on time! Turn all cell phones and ipods off or to vibrate before class starts. Also, remember to be courteous to everyone in the class, even when you disagree.

Late Work:

Please turn your work in on time. All late work will lose half a letter grade for every day it is late, but it is better to turn work in late than not at all.

 

Written work:

Please type, double-space, and use 12-point font, use MLA formatting and citation style, and include your name on all of our class assignments. If access to a computer will be a problem, please let me know and we’ll work out a solution.

 

About Course Content:

This is an adult level course; therefore, the subject matter of readings and discussions will contain adult material and will not be censored.

 

The Reading Load:

This class is a literature class, so the reading load is high! You should expect to read on average 80-100 pgs a week, but some weeks that will be higher. Do the best you can, and if you fall behind, it is your job to catch up, not the course’s job to slow down. Also, the texts we read can and will be challenging, so please make sure to take good notes and come up with questions as you read so that you can be prepared to participate in class. Finally, keep this in mind: the texts that disturb, anger, or confuse you the most upon first reading are usually the ones that end up teaching you the most.

 

Note:

If you have any special circumstances that you feel may influence your performance in this class (a diagnosed learning disability, physical disability, or anything at all that might interfere with your learning), please come chat with me so that we can create a learning environment that works for you.

I look forward to working with and learning from all of you.

Amy

 

Fairy Tale Depictions of Women:

Little Red Riding Hood (Charles Perrault).

Little Red Cap (Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm).

Little Red Hood (Germany/Poland)

 Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf

Cinderella (Germany, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, version of 1812).

The Cinder Maid (reconstructed from various European sources by Joseph Jacobs).

Cinderella by Anne Sexton

The Cinderella Page (Thanks to Ms Cat's Youth Group for the link)

Cinderella Adaptions:

§       The Baba Yaga (Russia).

§       The Wicked Stepmother (Kashmir).

§       The Green Knight (Denmark).

§       The Story of Tam and Cam (Vietnam).

§       Little Saddleslut (Greece).

 

Little Red Riding Adaptations:

§      Little Red Hat (Italy/Austria).

§       The Grandmother (France).

The True History of Little Golden-Hood (Charles Marelles).

Literary Terms:

Women's Literary Terms handout

Short Stories:

The Story of an Hour 

The Yellow Wallpaper

Barbie-Q 

Girl 

Mother Tongue

Never Marry A Mexican

Everyday Use

Racitatif

 

Identity Poems:

refugee ship

You Fit Into Me” by Margaret Atwood

“Variations on the Word Love” by Margaret Atwood

“Miss Rosie” by Lucile Clifton

“Mirror” by Sylvia Plath

“The Edge” by Sylvia Plath

Small Wires by Anne Sexton

“Housewife” Anne Sexton

 



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Last Updated: 4/8/12