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Ishmael Tarikh - Political Science

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Ishmael Tarikh

PART-TIME FACULTY
408.864.8460
Baldwin Winery #24
W: 3:30-5:30pm, and by appointment

 

Course Syllabi

 

Political Participation, Political Theory, Social Change, Law
B.A. Political Science, UCLA; M.A. Afro American Studies, UCLA; J.D. UC, Hastings College of the Law

Ishmael Tarikh was born in the segregated former capitol of the Confederacy.  Shortly after birth he and his family moved to Compton, CA. In 1978 he graduated from Alain Locke Senior High School, a school that was founded in the aftermath of the Watts Rebellion of 1965.  That Fall (1978) he enrolled in the University of California at San Diego. After his freshman year of college, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps.

 

In 1980 Ishmael Tarikh transferred to the University of California, Los Angeles, and immediately began a lifetime of “giving back” through community service.  He was conferred a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science in 1983.  In 1986 Ishmael was conferred a Master of Arts degree in Afro American Studies from UCLA.

 

In 2001 Ishmael was conferred a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.  While at Hastings Ishmael was active in the Black Law Students Association; he directed basketball intramurals; he sat on the Admissions Committee for the Legal Education Opportunity Program (where he was also a T.A.); he was an instructor in “Street Law”; and he was an intern who was certified to practice law at the San Francisco Public Defender’s Office.

 

Since law school Ishmael has maintained his personal commitment to community service in the capacities as an Instructor for the Center for Youth Development through Law at Boalt Hall; Coach of McClymonds High School’s Mock Trial Team; and as the Director of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights’ Bay Area PoliceWatch.  It is as an organizer/activist with EBC that Ishmael co-authored successful legislation [Proposition H, passed by the voters of San Francisco in November, 2003] in San Francisco to hold the San Francisco Police Department more accountable for their excesses.  During those struggles Ishmael appeared frequently in the media of radio, newsprint, and television interviews.  His viewpoints on police accountability have been broadcast throughout the nation, and via AP, Reuters, and the InterNet, they have been noted worldwide.

 

Ishmael has taught compulsory public education, community college, and has been academically appointed as a Lecturer at the California State University at Chico, the University of California at Santa Cruz, and San Jose State University.

 

Ishmael is currently the sole proprietor of Tarikh Consulting Services.  He has been a consultant for the University of San Francisco Law School’s Street Law Program; the Boalt Police Review Advocates; the June Jordan Small School for Equity; McClymonds High School Mock Trial Team; Making Waves Education Program; Prentice-Hall Publishers; and the Educational Testing Service.  He is a published author, a licensed attorney, and is currently a Political Science Instructor at De Anza College in Cupertino.

Fall 2017
CRN Course Title
22276 ICS -025.-01S Grassroots Democracy: Race, Politics and the American Promise
24131 POLI-001.-65Z American Government and Politics
22275 POLI-015.-01S Grassroots Democracy: Race, Politics and the American Promise
Winter 2018
CRN Course Title
32694 POLI-001.-66Z American Government and Politics
34960 POLI-001.-68Z American Government and Politics

American Government and Politics

DE ANZA COLLEGE CUPERTINO, CA
Fall Quarter 2017
Poli–001.65Z (online instruction)
Ofc. Hrs: W: 3:30-5:30pm, and by appointment                                                                               Room: Baldwin Winery #24
Phone:  864-8460
INSTRUCTOR: I. TARIKH e-mail:tarikhishmael@fhda.edu

Website: www.deanza.edu/faculty/tarikhishmael/

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This is an introductory course. As such, we will cover a great deal of material, but will not go into the depths that are available to you through more advanced Political Science course offerings. We will lay the basic foundation for understanding the creation, development, and perpetuation of our fundamental political institutions. This will be done with an initial focus on our national government, and a subsequent focus on our state government.

At the outset we will review the historical record of the founding of the American body politic, and will quickly move to a structural (what is the government made of), functional (how does its many parts interact), and practical (what is my role as an individual citizen) analysis. This course will expose enrolled students to the text of the United States and California State Constitutions; the evolution and interpretations of their texts; constitutional principles; key and current events; and finally, to the prospects and possibilities for a more inclusive and democratic society within the set framework.

Political Science 1 fulfills the General Education A.A. degree requirement (Social and Behavioral Sciences) for De Anza College; the General Education Breadth requirement for all California State Universities (CSUs); and the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) for all CSUs and UCs.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed for any student who wishes to make a serious study of these issues, and is prepared to do the extensive reading, writing, and research that are course requirements. However, the most important objective will always be the encouragement and development of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.

This course is for four units of academic credit in a lecture format. It adheres to all of the dictates of the promulgated De Anza College and Foothill/De Anza District policies outlined on page 19 (Academic Freedom and Academic Integrity) of the 2016-17 college catalog. Strict adherence will be followed. Please read these passages in the most sober and careful manner. Unlike much of our contemporaneous society, in this course we will agree, disagree, and agree to disagree while maintaining the decorum befitting a fine institution of higher learning.

 

TEACHING METHODOLOGY

In most cases, the instructor will develop the subjects of the sessions and place them in proper perspective so that a meaningful discussion can follow among the reader, students, and the instructor.  In these required readings, the subject will be viewed from various sides, and a comparison will be made between what the instructor has written, and what was written in the required and general references relating to the subject or event.  In this course the student will be required to participate through formal and informal writings (ie. Canvas postings).  The grade the student receives will result from a combination of online participation through postings, writing assignments, study guide submissions, and objective (multiple choice) examinations.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs)

SLO 1: Students will evaluate how political decisions are shaped by institutions and processes.

SLO 2: Students will assess the impact of political decisions on individuals and groups.

SLO 3: Students will demonstrate the capacity to effectively participate in the political process.

 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT

The Student Success Center offers individual and group tutoring, as well as several types of workshops. Students who use our services succeed at much higher rates than those who do not. As you may know, De Anza now also offers free online tutoring with Smarthinking, available to all students via MyPortal. Need help? Meet with tutors and attend workshops in the Student Success Center: www.deanza.edu/studentsuccess.

Can't make it to campus? Free online tutoring available to all De Anza students. Just login to MyPortal, go to the Students tab, and find the Smarthinking link. You can work with a tutor live (hours vary by subject) or post a question or piece of writing for a response. Smarthinking tutors can also help you with personal statements for transfer! For more information, go to deanza.edu/studentsuccess/onlinetutoring/

 

TEXT

There is 1 required text:

1) Introduction to American Government – California Edition (custom text) by Turner, C. et al BVT Publishing 2015 ISBN: 978-1-62751-570-2

 

In order to receive full G.E. credit (attaining at least a “C” as a final course grade) each student must score over 50% of possible points in every Performance Evaluation/Assessment area.

 

 

     PROPER PREPARATION PREVENTS POOR PERFORMANCE

 

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT

 

1)  Participation:  10% = 100 potential points  [this requires a minimum 5 postings to Canvas]

2)  Written Assignments:  45% = 450 potential points [5 assignments worth 90 points each]

3)  Objective Examinations:  45% = 450 potential points [5 Quizzes worth 90 points each] – Each Quiz (30 minutes timed) will be comprised of 40 multiple choice items that are largely (though not exclusively) taken from the provided Study Guide for the course.  Also, many items will be developed from the required readings (regardless of source) in our course.

10% = Participation

45% = Written Assignments

45% = Quizzes

 

Grading Scale:  is an approximation of final grading outcomes.  Frequently the final grade is higher than the scaling below, but it is never lower.

 

A+ = 950-1000 pts            A = 900-949          A- = 875-899           B+ = 850-874           B = 800-849

B- = 775-799                     C+ = 750-774        C = 675-749            D+ = 650-674

D = 600-649                       D- = 575-599        F = below 575 pts

 

 

 

***Please see Canvas for greater detail of assignments required during this course.***

 

 

Grass Roots Democracy: Race, Politics, and the American Promise

DE ANZA COLLEGE                                                                                   CUPERTINO,  CA

Fall Quarter 2017                                                                            Poli–015.01S/ICS-025.01S

Room: Forum 4                                                                                              MW 1:30-3:20pm

Ofc. Hrs: W: 3:30-5:30pm                                               Room: Baldwin Winery #24 864-8460

INSTRUCTOR: I. TARIKH                                                    e-mail: tarikhishmael@fhda.edu  

 

Website: faculty.deanza.edu/tarikhishmael/

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

            Applied and theoretical learning for students of social justice, this course will examine race, culture and contradictions in the ideal of the American Dream through a comparative analysis of American experiences of migration. Particular emphasis will be on the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans. The course will also discuss the contemporary social and cultural implications of the migration process. Using a multidisciplinary social science approach, attention will be given to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and ecology as well as the role of the state (policy) to the process of migration and immigration.

            Political Science 15/ISDC 25 fulfills the General Education A.A. degree requirement (Social and Behavioral Sciences) for De Anza College; the General Education Breadth requirement (Area D: Social and Behavioral Sciences) for all California State Universities (CSUs); and the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) [Area 4: Interdisciplinary, Social and Behavioral Sciences (4G)] for all UCs.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES 

            This course is designed for any student who wishes to make a serious study of these issues, and is prepared to do the extensive reading, writing, and research that are course requirements.  However, the most important objective will always be the encouragement and development of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.

 

            This course is for four units of academic credit in a lecture/discussion format.  It adheres to all of the dictates of the promulgated De Anza College policies outlined on pp. 149-151 of the Fall Schedule of Classes, and found in the current college catalog.  Of immense importance and emphasis are the policies attendant to Academic Integrity and Academic Freedom.  Strict adherence will be followed.  Please read these passages in the most sober and careful manner.  Unlike much of our contemporaneous society, in this course we will agree, disagree, and agree to disagree while maintaining the decorum befitting a fine institution of higher learning.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs)

SLO 1:  Students will identify key events and experiences in the migration histories of African Americans, European Americans, Mexican Americans and Asian Americans.

 SLO 2:  Students will identify and critically evaluate major conceptual issues regarding migration to and within the United States.

 SLO 3:  Students will identify, critically evaluate, and compare contemporary legacy of migration histories.

 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT

 The Student Success Center offers individual and group tutoring, as well as several types of workshops.  Students who use our services succeed at much higher rates than those who do not.  As you may know, De Anza now also offers free online tutoring with Smarthinking, available to all students via MyPortal.  

  Need help?  Meet with tutors and attend workshops in the  Student Success Center: www.deanza.edu/studentsuccess.  


Can't make it to campus?  
Free online tutoring available to all De Anza students.  Just login to MyPortal, go to the Students tab, and find the Smarthinking link.  You can work with a tutor live (hours vary by subject) or post a question or piece of writing for a response.  Smarthinking tutors can also help you with personal statements for transfer!  For more information, go to deanza.edu/studentsuccess/onlinetutoring/

 

TEACHING METHODOLOGY

             In most cases, the instructor will develop the subjects of the sessions and place them in proper perspective so that a meaningful discussion can follow among the reader, students, and the instructor.  In these discussions, the subject will be viewed from various sides, and a comparison will be made between what the instructor has said and what was written in the required and general references relating to the subject or event.  In this course the student will be required to participate in the discussion following the instructor presentation.  There will also be group collaborations, and debates.  The grade the student receives will result from a combination of class participation, midterm exams, and a final examination. 

 

TEXT

Race, Class, and Gender in the United States – An Integrated Study – 10th Edition (2016)

by Rothenberg, Paula               Macmillan Publishers               ISBN-13: 9781464178665

  

The required materials for this course will include handouts, videos, and required research.   Your attendance is mandatory in order to receive a passing grade.  Supplemental reading and research assignments will be given during lecture.  Roll will be taken once, during the first 15 minutes of each meeting.  If you have 3 consecutive unexcused absences, or excessive absences whether consecutive or not, you will be dropped from the class.  However, it is your personal responsibility to see to it that you have removed yourself from the Academic Record through the appropriate administrative channels (ie. Admissions and Records).  Electronic devices are not allowed in lecture, except with prior instructor or Disabled Student Services approval.  There is a zero tolerance policy for texting during class.  The 1st offense is a verbal warning.  Repeated offenses will be dealt with through one on one counseling, and ultimately will result in your being dropped from class.  Please mute your cell phones before the beginning of our class sessions – they can be tremendously disruptive. 

 

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT

 

1)         Participation =  in this segment of the course you are required to engage in the discourse.  This can be accomplished through voluntary interjection, or by being called upon to respond to a matter raised either by the instructor, or one of your peers.  This will account for a maximum of (100/200 points) of your Participation grade.  The remainder will be accrued through serving a minimum of 12 hours through Community Service.  The agency must be pre-approved by the Instructor, and verified hours will be accorded 5 points/hour of Community Service.  The minimum necessary earned Community Service points is 100; the maximum is 100 points.  This opportunity is capped at a maximum of 100 points for the Academic Quarter.

                       

2)         Midterms (2)  = in class (50 minutes), short answer essays. This will account for a maximum of 40% (400/1000 points) of your final grade.

 

3)         Final Exam = an extemporaneous series of short answer essays.  This will account for a maximum of 40% (400/1000 points) of your final grade.

 

20% = participation

40% = short answer, midterm examinations (2 total, worth 20% each)

40% = short answer, final examination

 

 

Final Grades will be calculated on a straight grading scale.  This means participation is worth 200 possible points; the midterms (combined) are worth 400 possible points; and the final is worth 400 possible points.  The total point possibility is 1000. 

 

A+ = 950-1000 pts      A = 900-949                A- = 875-899

B+ = 850-874              B = 800-849                B- = 775-799

C+ = 750-774              C = 675-749                D+ = 650-674             

D = 600-649                D- = 575-599               F = below 575 pts

 

Meeting Dates:

 

                                                Topic(s)                                               Reading /Assignment

 

 

Week 1:  9/25, 27                  Introduction/Syllabus/Overview     tba (to be announced)

 

 Week 2:  10/2, 4                    Forms of Migration           

 

                                                                                                           

 Week 3:  10/9, 11                  Pre Columbian Migration                        

 

                                                           

 Week 4:  10/16, 18                European Migration                                       

 

                                                      Midterm 1

 

Week 5:  10/23, 25                African Migration (forced)                               

 

 Week 6:  10/30, 11/1             Mexican Migration                                

 

 Week 7:  11/6, 8                    Asian Migration                                                 

                                                   Midterm 2

                        

Week 8:  11/13, 15                Immigration Policy                    

                                         (Executive Orders and DACA)

 

Week 9:  11/20, 22                Media Portrayals through film          

 

Week 10: 11/27, 29               Ideology/Propaganda                                      

 

Week 11: 12/4, 6                   Summations

                                                        

FINAL EXAMINATION

MONDAY, 11 DECEMBER 2017

1:45-3:45PM

 

 

 

 

Grass Roots Democracy:  Social Movements Since the 1960s

 

DE ANZA COLLEGE CUPERTINO, CA
Winter Quarter 2017
Poli–016.01S                                                                                                                                  

MW: 11:30am-1:20pm     Room: L64

Ofc. Hrs: W: 1:30-3:30pm, and by appointment                                                                               Room: Baldwin Winery #24
Phone:  864-8460
INSTRUCTOR: I. TARIKH e-mail:tarikhishmael@fhda.edu

Website: www.deanza.edu/faculty/tarikhishmael/

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Applied and theoretical learning for students of social justice, this course is a comparative survey of protest movements since the 1960s. An introductory, comparative, and interdisciplinary study of African American, Asian American, Mexican American, and white working class social and political struggles from 1960 to the present. The course traces the development of protest movements in response to racial, class, gender, and political inequality in the context of U.S. politics and history. The course critically examines the internal and external factors contributing to the rise and fall of social and political movements with special attention to the conjuncture of ecology, gender, race, ethnicity, culture, class, and sexual orientation in contemporary U.S. politics.

 Political Science 16 fulfills the General Education A.A. degree requirement (Social and Behavioral Sciences) for De Anza College; the General Education Breadth requirement (Area D: Social and Behavioral Sciences) for all California State Universities (CSUs); and the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) [Area 4: Interdisciplinary, Social and Behavioral Sciences (4G)] for all UCs.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed for any student who wishes to make a serious study of these issues, and is prepared to do the extensive reading, writing, and research that are course requirements.  We will identify and practice major methodologies of social science field research, and investigate key events and experiences of major social protest movements since the 1960’s.  However, the most important objective will always be the encouragement and development of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.

 This course is four units of academic credit in a lecture/discussion format.  It adheres to all of the dictates of the promulgated De Anza College policies outlined on pp. 149-151 of the Fall Schedule of Classes, and found in the current college catalog.  Of immense importance and emphasis are the policies attendant to Academic Integrity and Academic Freedom.  Strict adherence will be followed.  Please read these passages in the most sober and careful manner.  Unlike much of our contemporaneous society, in this course we will agree, disagree, and agree to disagree while maintaining the decorum befitting a fine institution of higher learning.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs)

• Student Learning Outcome: Students will investigate and identify key events and experiences of major social protest movements since the 1960's.

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Students will identify, appraise, and compare factors leading to the development of social protest consciousness in social protest movements since the 1960's with specific attention to issues of ethnicity, race, class and gender.

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Students will demonstrate the capacity to participate effectively in political processes and techniques common to social movements.

 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT

The Student Success Center offers individual and group tutoring, as well as several types of workshops.  Students who use our services succeed at much higher rates than those who do not.  As you may know, De Anza now also offers free online tutoring with Smarthinking, available to all students via MyPortal. 
 

Need help?  Meet with tutors and attend workshops in the  Student Success Center: www.deanza.edu/studentsuccess.  

Can't make it to campus?  
Free online tutoring available to all De Anza students.  Just login to MyPortal, go to the Students tab, and find the Smarthinking link.  You can work with a tutor live (hours vary by subject) or post a question or piece of writing for a response.  Smarthinking tutors can also help you with personal statements for transfer!  For more information, go to deanza.edu/studentsuccess/onlinetutoring/

 

TEACHING METHODOLOGY

In most cases, the instructor will develop the subjects of the sessions and place them in proper perspective so that a meaningful discussion can follow among the reader, students, and the instructor.  In these discussions, the subject will be viewed from various sides, and a comparison will be made between what the instructor has said and what was written in the required and general references relating to the subject or event.  In this course the student will be required to participate in the discussion following the instructor presentation.  There will also be group collaborations, and debates.  The grade the student receives will result from a combination of class participation, community service, oral presentations, a research paper, and a final examination. 

 

TEXTS

There are no required texts for this course.  The readings will be assigned in class, and students will be required to do the necessary research.  This research could include readings, film, events, etc.

The required materials for this course will include handouts, videos, and required research.   Your attendance is mandatory in order to receive a passing grade.  Supplemental reading and research assignments will be given during lecture.  Roll will be taken once, during the first 15 minutes of each meeting.  If you have 3 consecutive unexcused absences, or excessive absences whether consecutive or not, you will be dropped from the class.  However, it is your personal responsibility to see to it that you have removed yourself from the Academic Record through the appropriate administrative channels (ie. Admissions and Records).  Electronic devices are not allowed in lecture, except with prior instructor or Disabled Student Services approval.  There is a zero tolerance policy for texting during class.  The 1st offense is a verbal warning.  Repeated offenses will be dealt with through one on one counseling, and ultimately will result in your being dropped from class.  Please mute your cell phones before the beginning of our class sessions – they can be tremendously disruptive. 

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT

1)         Participation =  in this segment of the course you are required to engage in the discourse.  This can be accomplished through voluntary interjection, or by being called upon to respond to a matter raised either by the instructor, or one of your peers.  This will account for a maximum of (100/200 points) of your Participation grade.  The remainder (100/200 points) will be accrued through completing Community Service in the form of a Field Research Project.  This will account for a maximum of 20% (200/1000 points) of your final grade.                    

2)         Oral Presentations (2)  = collaborative, and in class (format to be determined). This will account for a maximum of 20% (200/1000 points) of your final grade.

 3)         Research Paper = a 4-5 page effort.  This will account for a maximum of 30% (300/1000 points) of your final grade.

 4)         Final Exam = an extemporaneous series of short answer essays.  This will account for a maximum of 30% (300/1000 points) of your final grade.

20% = participation

20% = oral presentations (2 total, worth 10% each)

30% = research paper

30% = short answer, final examination 

Final Grades will be calculated on a straight grading scale.  This means participation is worth 200 possible points; the oral presentations (combined) are worth 200 possible points; the research paper is worth 300 possible points; and the final is worth 300 possible points.  The total point possibility is 1000. 

 

A+ = 950-1000 pts      A = 900-949                A- = 875-899

B+ = 850-874              B = 800-849                B- = 775-799

C+ = 750-774              C = 675-749                D+ = 650-674             

D = 600-649                D- = 575-599               F = below 575 pts

 

 

 




Contact
email icon Email: Ishmael Tarikh
phone icon Phone: 408.864.8460

Political Science
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Last Updated: 9/22/17