De Anza Fountain

James Ahern - Speech Communication

Preparation Outline

 

TITLE

 

General Purpose: to inform, to persuade, or to entertain

Specific Purpose Statement: a statement of what you want your audience to do when you finish your speech.

Central Idea/thesis statement: a one-sentence summary of your speech.

 

INTRODUCTION

The introduction should be written out word for word. Use complete sentences in your outline. The introduction should include the following:

1. Attention getter;

2. Preview of the speech;

3. Establish the credibility and goodwill of the speaker: state your qualification (experience/research) to speak about this topic.

Connective: Move from the introduction into the main point of the body.

BODY

I. A single complete sentence expressing the main point of this section of the speech.

     A. Subpoint (As with main points, subpoints should be written in full sentences.)

          1. Sub-subpoint: written in full sentences.

          2. Sub-subpoint

     B. Subpoint

Connective: Use a transition or connective to move from one main point to the next.

II. A single complete sentence expressing the main point of this section of the speech.

     A. Subpoint

     B. Subpoint

          1. Sub-subpoint

               a. Sub-sub-subpoint

               b. Sub-sub-subpoint

          2. Sub-subpoint

Connective: Use a transition or connective to move from one main point to the next.

III. A single complete sentence expressing the main point of this section of the speech.

     A. Subpoint

          1. Sub-subpoint

          2. Sub-subpoint

     B. Subpoint

          1. Sub-subpoint

          2. Sub-subpoint

          3. Sub-subpoint

     C. Subpoint

Connective: Use a transition or connective to move with from the body of the speech to the conclusion.

CONCLUSION

The conclusion should be written out word for word. The conclusion should contain the following objectives:

     1. Review your main points;

     2. Make a memorable statement. 

REFERENCES

The The reference section should include your citations following the American Psychological Association (APA) format. (See below)

 

 

THE AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION

(A. P.A.) CITATION FORMAT 

 

Place the references at the end of your preparation outline, put the word "References" at the top of the page listing, and double space each citation. For additional  information or other citations, consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th ed., 2001.  

References 

Citing a book: 

Adler, R. & Rodman, G. (2006). Understanding human communication (9th              ed.). New York, N. Y.: Oxford University Press

Citing an article in a book: 

Anderson, P. (1985). Nonverbal immediacy in interpersonal communication. In A.        W. Sigman & S. Feldstein (Eds.),. Multicultural integration of nonverbal                behavior (pp. 1 - 36). Hillside, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 

Citing when there is no author or editor

College bound seniors. (1979). Princeton, NJ: College Board Publications.

Citing a journal article: 

Cooper, M. (1988). Rhetorical criticism and Foucault's philosophy of discursive            events. Central States Speech Journal, 39, 1-17. 

Citing a magazine article: 

Gardner, H. (1981, December). Do babies sing a universal song? Psychology            Today, 70-76. 

Citing a newspaper article: 

Duke, 1. (1981, September 4). Basketball player loses position. San Diego                   Tribune, p. 7.

Citing a brochure: 

Institute for Teaching and Learning (1993). Guidelines for teaching                                communicatively apprehensive students (3rd ed.) (Brochure]. Lexington,            KY: Author. 

Citing an interview: 

Smith, J. J. (2006, February 1). Instructor at De Anza College (555) 555-5555.

Citing from a database: 

Levin, G. (1997, December 15). TV: Back to the future. Variety, 369, 1-3.                            Retrieved: August 8,2001, from Expanded Academic ASAP database                      (A20385512). 

Citing a website:

lguchi, L. (2003, February 3). Japan warfare. History of Japan. Retrieved March 11, 2004, from http://book.edu/japan

 

Source: American Psychological Association (APA). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Contact
email Email: James Ahern
Phone: 408.864.8999x3103
Office hours: MW--4:25 to 4:55 p.m.

Office Location: L49

 

 

 

 

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Last Updated: 1/3/14